Opening Up Yet Again

April 20, 2013 at 4:48 pm (Death and Dying, Hospitalizations, Living, Living With Chronic Illness, Medical, Mental Health, Spiritual, The Journey Towards Diagnosis) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

I am having another surgery. We’re not sure exactly when, but it will be before the week is out; my best guess right now is either Tuesday or Wednesday. The surgery will be very similar,  but not identical, to the surgery I had in December: they need to open my abdomen, remove an infected abscess that has now grown to the size of “a large grapefruit”. The various departments that have been working with me since I got admitted last Thursday have being doing all they can to try to avoid this surgery for many reasons.

Firstly, every abdominal surgery I have, weakens the abdominal wall and makes me even more prone to hernias and other serious re-occuring medical problems. As these abscesses are happening as a reaction to other abdominal surgeries, in a fucked up way removing this abscess may cause more to form in the long run. These surgeries are stop-gap measures so as to avoid a much bigger, more invasive surgery; one in which they would have to remove a portion of my bowels. My plastics surgeon, Dr. Sacks, is still hoping that pumping me full of high dose antibiotic via the PICC line will soften the abscess and help it break down on its own, but he’s the only doctor still hanging on to that hope.

This surgery will be different because I won’t be having a panniculectomy this time. Instead, they’re going to cut a smaller incision, but a larger hole. (Dr. Awesome described it as being about the size of a loaf of Wonder bread.) They will remove the abscess and any infected tissue that surrounds it, but they won’t close the wound when they’re finished. If they did that, they’d be leaving a perfect place for a new abscess to form. Think of it this way: instead of just evicting the tenants, we’re burning the house down.

So what’s going to happen is they will leave the wound open, but pack the empty space with a special kind of bandage that will help keep fluid from building up. I will likely have to carry around some sort of knapsack or fanny pack that has the motors in it, but I will be able to leave the house and go do stuff as soon as I feel able. This being said, I’m currently not planning on canceling any of my upcoming gigs except for the BR class (since I’ll likely be having surgery that day.)

Here’s a cute little tidbit: Either because I mention it in passing, or something triggers it, my doctors are finding out that I have nicknames for them. They mostly know about Dr. Awesome. The resident that I see weekday mornings complained, so he’s Dr. Fabulous. When I saw the guy who is working this weekend for Dr. Sacks’ service, I flat out asked him what he wanted to be called, and he decided on the Grey’s Anatomy moniker Dr.McSteamy – but I dunno, he looks more like Patrick Dempsy than Eric Dane.

This is McDreamy, Patrick Dempsey And this is McSteamy, Eric Dane.

I’ve been doing some serious thinking about this whole thing from a spiritual perspective, as well. I’ve talked it over with my pastoral care counselor, my Clan’s shaman, and other important spiritual folk in my life. At first, I was really angry at Hel, but I’ve come to peace with that now.

The first thing I have come to sit with, and to dwell within, is the shattered illusion that just because I made it through December’s ordeal doesn’t mean that I am never going to be sick, or in the hospital, or need months of bed rest. I had somehow convinced myself that if I just healed from that surgery, everything else was going to be smooth sailing from there on out. The arrival of the madness quilt, as well as the writing I’ve been doing for the book, let me sink into this soft comfort zone of not having to deal with all this death and dying stuff.

I had forgotten that way before I accepted this deal with Hel, I had agreed to be the Dying Man for Baphomet. Part of that Job is to explore the spirituality of dying and of death, so as to bring peace to others. In an odd way, the December ordeal was a formalized first step in that process, a “put up or shut up” moment if you will. I had talked about being the Dying Man, but honestly I hadn’t really thought about the nitty gritty of the death processes. Once I knew I had to face the surgery in December as some fashion of death, especially not knowing if that fashion was going to be literal/physical, I started doing a great deal of reading and research about the physical act of dying. I looked at pictures of dead bodies for the first time, real dead bodies and not just live models made up to look dead. I watched documentaries about how we treat our dead, the funereal processes and ancestor veneration. I read a ton of Near Death Experiences, and attempted to have my own through meditation (and meditation alone, I promise you.) Even after I woke up on the other side of the ordeal, I wrote a lot in my private journal about how the death process feels and what it’s like to be newly dead.

All of this, though, lived inside my own head. I still haven’t said very much about what happened to me, or what it meant, or how it changed the way I saw my own life and the lives of those closest to me. I’m not sold that it’s meant for public consumption, and by no means am I trying to say that I will continue to get abscesses until I poop out some incredibly spiritual insight on the means and manner of death and dying.

I do feel, though, that it’s important for me and for those who allow me space inside their head (by reading this blog or being my friend or anything in between) to cherish their lives. Each and every spoonful of energy is important, and what you do with it matters. This doesn’t mean you should never rest, running around trying to make every moment the best possible moment to the detriment of your soul and body; but it does mean that you can celebrate the fact you’re alive as often as you need to. You don’t need – nor should you really want – constant reminders that this life could end at any moment and therefore you should launch into everything that scares you or gives you pause. But even in the scant few months I’ve been back among the living, I have already fallen into the old pattern of allowing circumstances to overwhelm me. I spent more time feeling stressed and emotionally wrought because the effect of making choices that put my desires and needs before those of others keeps holding me back. I even got a message from a God telling me that if all those pulling me in a thousand directions didn’t stop, Hel would revoke Her permissions around having human relationships.

I let it get that bad, and it got that bad fast. It wasn’t anyone’s fault but mine, and I own that. The reason this abscess got as advanced as it did is because I put off going to the doctor. I saw the swelling and had a strong guess as to what it meant, but I was so intent and focused on the idea that I was moving on from all of that medical stuff and focusing on my Work I ignored it for far too long. And what really sucks is that I didn’t even accomplish what I really wanted to do with my time instead of seeking medical care; I spent the majority of it feeding the needs of others. This surgery is, in my own mind if not in reality, a direct consequence of not putting my own needs in front of the needs of others. Of not creating and enforcing my own boundaries around my time and energy. I like to think that it’s also the reaction from other people not respecting my feeble attempts at boundaries, but blaming others isn’t going to get me anywhere, and it’s not them that are going to be walking around with a giant vacu-wound on their bellies for a month.

As your friendly neighborhood Dying Man, I will share with you that the hard lesson I’m still working on. I have a life – my own life – and it is absolutely necessary for survival that a good portion of that life belong to me and me alone. This sounds very elementary, but for those of us that spend so much time helping and serving others it can be the hardest lesson to learn. It’s very easy to put your own needs aside, to internally compare the needs of someone else to your own and always decide that the other is more important.  Even more personally, I need to remember that my soul needs the body to express itself, and because taking care of my body is so much more boring than taking care of the soul.

Another big issue is that it’s hard to start building relationship and life skills when you’re surrounded by those who expect you to have a doctorate degree. It’s a two way street in some ways – I can muster all my strength to build and maintain boundaries, but because I’m still learning what it takes to make them it’s too easy for others to steamroll over them without a thought (or better yet, stand around and say, “Aww, look, Del made a teeny weeny boun-da-wee. How adorable!”).

In order for me to survive and thrive in the life Hel has granted me, using the skills Loki imbued in me, reacting to the hot pokers Baphomet has fucked me with, I need to take more time for myself at all costs. I need to stop wasting time worrying about things that don’t directly relate to the work (and Work) in front of me. This also means that when other people try to lead me down paths unrelated, I need to be more brutal and straightforward about distraction and what distractions support and uplift me and which ones make me depressed and unmotivated.

I will write more about the impending surgery once Dr. Sacks actually decides it’s going to happen. For now, prayer for discernment and clarity of communication would be the most helpful – and NO REIKI PLEASE.

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