Spiral

April 21, 2015 at 7:59 pm (Congestive Heart Failure, Death and Dying, Hospitalizations, Living With Chronic Illness, Medical) (, , , , )

It’s been some time since I updated ye faithful readers as to what is going on with me medically.

Some of you may know that I’ve spent more time in Johns Hopkins than I have in my own home since August 2014. I was diangosed with right-sided heart failure and we struggled to figure out why I kept slipping into volume overload (when your body has a lot more fluid in the tissues) after being discharged. There are a lot of theories, but the story is about to change, so don’t jump to leaving a comment just yet.

When I get that swollen, the infected tissue from my pannus starts to hurt tremendously.

So the status quo since August has been:

  • Go to Johns Hopkins ED as directed by another doctor
  • Spend a month diuresing down to my dry weight
  • Deal with bad pain from my pannus
  • Get to dry waight, get discharged with plan
  • Do the plan by the letter
  • Notice that the swelling is back
  • Seven GOTO One. (in less geek terms, rinse and repeat.)

I’ve been in the hospital more often than I’ve been home in the last six months.

Things are moving quickly, but not in a way I would have chose.

Today I learned that my congestive heart failure now includes both sides of my heart (whereas before I had been diagnosed as having right-sided heart failure). This obviously affects my prognosis, and not in a good way.

I’ve gone ahead and canceled gigs through the end of the summer. Not only does travel become much more complicated when you’re terminally ill, but I can’t guarantee I’ll be out of the hospital, much less felling well enough. And that’s not fair to organizers.So if you’ve been hoping to catch up with me at Beltane, FSG or some other event I am usually at, you should start thinking about an alternate plan.

Tonight they are moving me to a different part of the hospital. I joke with my nurses that I’m trying to win “Hopkins Bingo”, where a patient must have a stay of longer than 24 in a building in order for it to count. When you’ve stayed in all of the different buildings, you win. I got a difficult square this time; Bloomburg is 95% pediatrics, but one floor is the cardiac ICU stepdown, which is where I was. That’s not easy to get at all unless you’ve been playing this game far too long.

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Reality Bites

March 1, 2015 at 2:40 pm (Congestive Heart Failure, Death and Dying, Hospitalizations, Medical, The Journey Towards Diagnosis) (, , , , , )

This entry will be short and to the point. I know, so unlike me. Well, here it goes.

stoneandballoon

Today is my Mom’s birthday.

Yesterday, I met with a Hospice/Palliative Care nurse.

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Close Call

November 25, 2014 at 3:09 pm (Congestive Heart Failure, Death and Dying, Hospitalizations, Medical) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Everyone in the room – the doctors, nurses, Rave, and even me – all thought the same thing, but no one wanted to say it.

For me, it became tangible when I realized I was having visual hallucinations and disturbances and couldn’t hear out of one ear. My blood pressure numbers were getting lower and lower and no one knew why. My chest hurt like crazy and I was struggling to breathe both out of pain as well as panic. The doc even asked me what my advanced directives were – like did I want a breathing tube – which they had never done before. That’s when I knew I might actually die, like, right now.

I’ve written a lot about how I hate asking people for rides, that it feels like panhandling. Even when people assure me that I can always ask and they like doing it, I still feel terrible about the whole process. After I left the hospital in October, my team had set me up with a slew of follow-up appointments; the idea was I was not well enough to go back home and return to normal life, but I wasn’t urgently sick enough to warrant staying in the hospital anymore. In particular, Johns Hopkins runs a “Heart Failure Bridge Clinic”, the “Bridge” being between hospitalization and home. You’re able to access services that regular doctors or cardiologist offices don’t offer, like IV diuretics.

I was able to attend my first Bridge appointment, and it was pretty standard. Other than a small med adjustment, it didn’t seem like a big deal. So when I wasn’t able to find a ride to the second appointment, I didn’t really stress over it. But then I missed a PCP appointment as well. It was a combination of people legitimately unable to make it and me not being in an emotional state conducive to putting as much effort in as I should have. Both Rave and I have been swamped with a preponderance of to-do items that are all “very important” and time sensitive as well.

I don’t remember when we first noticed that my blood pressures were off. I know I had started feeling dizzy and intoxicated without any cause. But however we got there, I started getting these ridiculously and somewhat unbelievably low readings with an average around 90/60. My home nurse told me to keep a close eye on it; well, that’s not exactly true, as she first recommended I go to the ER. When I told her I was feeling fairly okay and really didn’t want to go back to the hospital (can you blame me after a series of two-to-three week stays in the last four months?), she told me to keep an eye on it until I saw her later that week.

I decided to ask Dr. Google if there was some easy things I could do to bring my blood pressure up. This is when I was introduced into my current medical dilemma: as a congestive heart failure patient, I should severely restrict my fluid intake; but the one reliable way to raise and maintain a good blood pressure is to drink a healthy amount of fluids. So over the next few days I drank more fluids that I was “supposed” to and as it were, the more I drank the better I felt and the better my numbers were.

Well, not all my numbers. People with CHF have to weigh themselves every day because even small gains may be a sign of fluid retention and could require a change in your diuretic dosing. Every day I “cheated” on my restriction, the next morning would see the resultant weight gain; usually only a pound or two, but by the end of the week I was up over 10lbs. My nurse was pretty unhappy but we all agreed that since I had a Bridge Clinic appointment that Wednesday, I would just wait and see what they had to say.

Except that no one I asked could take me to Baltimore that day. By Tuesday midnight, I sent the message to cancel my appointment. I don’t know what my plan was, but until they invent transporters I didn’t have a choice. I couldn’t even decide to drive myself, because Rave’s truck is still too broken to pass inspection and she needs my car to get to work. I didn’t sleep well that night. If I called an ambulance, they would have taken me to Hillbilly Hospital, and that was NOT going to happen. I felt defeated and depressed.

Even though Rave has been in hot water at work over how much time she takes off (mostly to take care of me), on the off chance the PTO gods would smile upon her, she submitted a request before she left work on Tuesday to see if they would let her take me to the appointment. We were pretty convinced the answer would be no, but I didn’t have a lot of other options. We were both surprised that when she got to work Wednesday morning, she saw that her request had been approved. She hopped right back into her car and came back to Hagerstown to pick me up.

We made a mad dash to Baltimore as we were cutting it pretty close, and the Clinic is one of those draconian offices that refuses to see you if you’re more than 10-15 minutes late. We even called ahead to see if that would help, but no dice. On top of that, I had only been to the location once before, and it’s hiding in one of the regular towers (instead of in the Outpatient Center) and I didn’t know which parking garage we should use. To make matters worse, there was practically no available parking in the one we chose, so we spent another ten minutes driving around in circles. We breezed into the office exactly 15 minutes late.

The nurse practitioner took my vitals and saw both the weight gain and low pressure – 80/40. She left the office to call her supervisor. Rave and I figured it was to figure out how much IV meds to give me…until more than 20 minutes go by and she still hasn’t returned. Finally, I gave voice to what we were both starting to fear – that they were going to admit me on the spot. Which is sort of what happened. There weren’t any free beds in the unit I would stay in, and after taking my blood pressure a number of times and getting consistently low numbers she felt the best course of action was to send me to the ER so I could be monitored while waiting for a bed. I am very glad to this day that this is what happened, as if I had not been in the ER when things went south I don’t know what would have happened.

Now, it’s good to know that even though my blood pressure numbers were ridiculously low (normal/average blood pressure should be somewhere around 120/80), I was upright, alert, oriented. I felt a little dizzy, a little fuzzy, and I was struggling more than usual with my aphasia, but overall I felt okay. I was more upset at the prospect of yet another long stay at the hospital forcing me to miss something I was really looking forward to (Thanksgiving with some of my most beloved tribe of the heart) and more medical complications and/or restrictions. But then things starting getting worse.

The first thing that clued me in as to how serious things were getting was when they moved me into the ERs version of an ICU bed. I was wired and constantly monitored. They took my blood pressure in just about every way conceivable – while I was in different positions, on different parts of my arms, and with different sphygmomanometers. My numbers were getting even lower – 80/30. 75/45. 60/40.

All of a sudden one of my ears went silent. It both felt and sounded like someone had slapped a thick earmuff on one side of my head. And of course, doctors and nurses and other hospital personnel are asking me a thousand and one questions and now I couldn’t hear them clearly. I was also getting more confused and finding it harder to understand everything that was happening. At one point, someone offered papers for Rave to sign because I was acting so erratically. (Yes, it’s legal, as she is my designated medical proxy.) I do remember someone asking me to state what was in my advanced directives, mostly about whether or not I had a DNR.

That was the first time I really and truly thought to myself, “This could kill me. They’re doing this because it’s possible this could actually happen.”

That was also when I noticed the visual distortion. I saw fireworks everywhere. Lots of red and off-white lights danced everywhere I looked. After images were causing trails if I moved too quickly (or if the thing I looked at moved quickly too).The light was getting brighter, to the point where I couldn’t really see anything else around me. My sense of chronological/linear time goes fuzzy at this point, so I have no idea in what sequence things actually progressed.

I do remember starting telling people, “I’m really scared. I am really, really scared.” Somehow, my reasoning said that if I refused to lay down I wouldn’t pass out or die. I started breathing more deliberately, again thinking that if I just kept willing each breath I wouldn’t stop breathing. The lowest recorded blood pressure was 40/30, although doctors are skeptical that it actually got that low since, in fact, I didn’t pass out.

That was just about a week ago. I eventually made my way into the critical care unit (which they call “stepdown”, as it is a transition between ICU and a medical floor) where we found out what the hell was going on. It seems there were three forces at play, and all of them were playing to win – which in this case means “messing with Del”.

  • CHF/Edema – In order to avoid retaining fluid which makes my poor heart and lungs work harder, I have to stay under a certain amount of fluid intake a day. I also take “water pills”, aka pills that make your body absorb less fluid and just pee it out instead. However, if I flush out too much fluid it puts a strain on my kidneys, which are already starting to show signs of damage from all this stress. It also leads to…
  • Dehydration – I am only supposed to ingest between 1.5 and 2 liters of fluid a day, and that’s not just what I drink. It includes any substance that becomes a liquid by the time it gets to your stomach, like jello, ice cream, pudding, salad dressing, sauce, etc. But as we all know, bodies need a certain amount of fluid to regulate themselves. I’ve always had low blood pressure, and 9 times out of 10 that’s considered a good thing. But when I was feeling dizzy and ill and I was pretty sure it was due to how low it had gotten, Dr. Google said the best bet to raise it was to drink more fluid, so I did. And even though I had increased my intake to almost 4 liters a day, I was still dehydrated because…
  • Infection – My pannus (the hanging part of my belly, the part that the 2012 surgery was about) is super swollen, which I assumed was part of the water retention caused by the CHF. Turns out that was only half of the story. My pannus is, once again, riddled with infected tissue. There isn’t a collection, like an abscess, that can be drained or removed. It is diffuse through the tissues. So my body was using every bit of fluid to make white blood cells and other infection-fighting stuff, which leads us back to dehydration. The lack of available fluids meant that the infection could proliferate faster and more efficiently. It didn’t help that I had to skip taking some of my meds for a month due to some health insurance stuff, and some of them were my maintenence antibiotics. (Bad Del.)

Yesterday I was transferred out of the critical care unit back to a medical floor I have been to before, which is nice because I know and like most of the nurses here. It also means less wires and other restrictions. The infection is pretty bad and causing a great deal of pain – the doctors keep telling me it’s the kind of healing that gets worse before it gets better. I’m on the good drugs for now – vancomycin (antibiotic version of a nuclear bomb) and dilaudid (painkiller version of a nuclear bomb). I’m in a lot of pain, but in a weird way it’s a familiar kind of pain, which makes it a little easier to deal with.

Most people with CHF really struggle with knowing how much fluid they can safely have without causing problems. Unfortunately, for me it looks like the line between too little and too much is very fine, and I’ve been warned that not only will it take some time and experimentation to figure out exactly where that line is and that there will be a lot of fuckups along the way. Fuckups mean more hospital stays.

My primary care doctor has even mentioned that I could go live in a skilled nursing facility – basically, a special floor in a nursing home that’s reserved for people of all ages who are too medically complicated to live at home but not sick enough to stay in the hospital. The idea is abhorrent to me, but if my lack of transportation is putting my life at risk I can’t fully dismiss the idea. Rave and I have started preliminary browsing to see if moving to Baltimore is even possible. However much we hate living in Hagerstown, the place we have is a godsend of accessibility; Baltimore is full of three-story row houses which will very likely not work for us. But I can’t even think about moving with a full heart until I deal with the divorce settlement, because Mike is claiming I have a part-time job with which I can support myself and therefore he should not have to pay spousal support or cover my prescriptions like he’s been doing since we split. I can’t afford a lawyer and few lawyers do family law pro-bono unless there are custody issues. It’s a big morass I cannot deal with without getting chest pain – and I’m not saying that to be melodramatic, I’m saying it because it really does cause me that much stress.

That’s the story of my close call. The reality and tangibility of the end of my journey is coalescing, and it’s a lot more terrifying than I was prepared for. One of my doctors admitted to me that if he were in my shoes, he’d be freaking out a lot more than I am. He even offered to send me a social worker to talk to, which is probably not a bad idea.

If you wanted to send flowers or the like, you can email Rave at delandrave at gmail dot com and she’ll give you the information. It would be greatly appreciated. I’m feeling kind of lonely and sad these days.

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The Magic Number

August 8, 2014 at 2:26 pm (Death and Dying, Hospitalizations, Medical, Mental Health, The Journey Towards Diagnosis) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Hey there, dear readers. Before I begin, I want to apologize. When I started this blog, one of the main reasons was so I could share information about my health in a timely manner from a centralized location – so I didn’t have to post to every single social medium and then answer comments from them as well – but this time I didn’t feel ready to blog about coming to Johns Hopkins ER or why I came in. I’m still not ready to write about all of it. But here is a little information, a little navel gazing, and a little update. -Del

A while ago, back in March, I started taking on some serious edemitous weight (what we non-medical types call “water weight”, “edema”, or “swelling”) – one doctor guestimated I had gained 50-70lbs of swelling (and he was pretty close to exactly right). I began seeing a long and complicated list of specialists, each of whom happily pointed to one another as the doctor who could help me tackle this once and for all. I was bounced from cardiologist to infectious disease to primary care to nephrology and around again. I got put on several different combinations of drugs, kept on using the pneumatics when I could, tried to limit my fluid intake, etc, etc, etc.

I will admit, I was feeling pretty defeated. Not only did each doctor think it was definitely a SEP (Someone Else’s Problem), but none of them treated it like a big deal. When I had to buy new shoes 3 sizes larger, I barely got a shrug. To me, my Non-Violet Beauregard impression felt like something pretty hazardous but even when doctors was using scary words like “organ failure” and “amputation” they did it with a resignation usually used about troublesome boys.

After all, the list of symptoms I had –

  • Extreme Fatigue
  • Shortness of Breath
  • Apparent Weight Gain (Swelling)
  • Lack of Appetite/Nausea
  • Sleep Disturbance

– could all (and were) attributed to being obese/sedentary. When I showed my primary doc that I was losing my breath just from standing up and buttoning my pants, we had a ten minute conversation/debate; she was forceful with her opinion that I was decompensating. (Basically, the opposite of ‘getting in shape’.) I kept arguing that even if I was truly decompensating, I was pretty sure it wouldn’t happen that fast and that dramatically.

But all along, everything that popped up she immediately tried to relate to my weight. In fact, when I came back to her after getting the diagnosis “Volume Overload” (Totally my Del Tashlin cover band), she weighed me to confirm that I’ve had a radical weight change – 60ish pounds in 3 months.

But to me, that wasn’t the shock. It was the magic number. I think we all have one. It may not be the same statistic, but there’s a number somewhere in your life that fits the category.

  • “If I ever have to buy my pants at Lane Bryant, just shoot me.” (number implied)
  • The day my scale says 300lbs is the day I lose my shit.”
  • “When I can no longer buy clothes at the mall because I am too big/short/tall/etc, I will have to kill myself.”
  • My cousin’s bra size is a 44G. I’d rob a bank to get a reduction before I would live like that.

There I am, standing on the scale looking at the highest weight I’ve ever been. I’m not seeing the magic number, but I’m very close to it. I take a deep breath and start reminding myself that it is edematous weight, swelling, something that will go away once they figure out what is causing it. Maybe a few tears roll down the side of my face, because it’s a number I wasn’t ready for that day.

As we go back into the exam room, my doc makes a comment about possibly revisiting the weight loss surgery conversation. Anyone who has followed my story from the beginning can probably guess how that conversation went. She’s trying to assure me that just because I had ONE bad experience with ONE doctor should not mean I reject the possibility forever. I am trying to clarify to her that this weight is not “Del ate some extra cheetos and skipped aqua aerobics” weight, but “something is physically wrong with Del that is causing water retention at a ridiculous level”.

I left the appointment feeling pretty sure that my GP wasn’t going to be any further help in this situation. Once again, I’m thinking I might have to go looking for someone new – especially in light of what has happened. In the most obvious application of the metaphor, I came to her with a list of symptoms of a serious medical problem of immediate need of treatment, and what she saw was a fat, lazy person who wasn’t taking care of themselves.

I got so disheartened, I stopped giving a shit. I still took my meds and the like, but I stopped making doctor’s appointments. I lost my fire. Inside I knew that something serious was going on, but it was as if I ran around the village telling everyone the Monsters are Coming and the village reacted with affected apathy. It wasn’t until Rave and I noticed that the swelling was getting markedly worse, and now was happening faster than before, that we decided something had to be done.

Now I am inpatient at Johns Hopkins and I know for certain what all my symptoms were caused by and what the short term plans are to get me going home, at the very least. As I discussed things with Winter last night, he asked me what he and the Clan could do to support me in this time, and I paraphrase for you, dear reader, as well:

I feel like I need some time to wander in the dark, bump into the walls, wack my toe on the moulding. I need permission to let this filter in slowly, rather than jump to branding it on social media for the 140 characters times worth of edification faded into the next cute cat meme. I don’t want to have to educate each and every person I talk to about what it is, how I got it, and how we’re treating it. I just want to sit with this for a while, think about it, run my fingers around the edges and see if there’s a contingency envelope hidden somewhere.

When I’m ready, I will share everything on the blog and you will all know what’s going on. Until then, for now, it’s just mine to feel in all the ways I want to feel it.

(And the good news is, I’ve already lost 15 lbs away from the magic number, so that’s reassuring.)

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Still Not Dead

June 26, 2014 at 11:12 pm (Death and Dying, Living With Chronic Illness, Medical, The Journey Towards Diagnosis) (, , , , , , )

I think I’ve told this story before: when I called my mom, I would always start by saying “I’m not dead!” This was because once she chastised me for waiting too long in between calls and it left her worrying I might have died. In fact, she would often leave messages for me that would said, “I just want to know you’re not dead!” It was a playful thing between us, because of our shared dark humor about living with chronic illness.

I say this to you because it’s been a while since I’ve posted anything on either blog. One would hope that means that there’s nothing to write about, but in fact the opposite is true. Things have been both busy and difficult in my life as of late, and I’ve had so much on my plate “writing a blog post” almost seemed like a frivolous endeavor.

It is made more complex with a new neurological symptom I’ve gained. For years, I’ve suffered from a very soft form of aphasia – basically, I can look at a cup, and know it is a cup, and can describe what a cup does, but I can’t say the word “cup”. It’s like someone has temporarily erased it from my memory. Now I find myself misspelling simple words over and over again (It took me three tries to get ‘misspelling’ right!) until I give up and use spell check. If you’ve seen me type, you know that I type super fast – 110 WPM, last measured – and I rarely get hung up by a word like that. And the words that catch me aren’t super difficult ones to spell – I spent 10 minutes on “column” the other day, writing “collum” over and over again. Needless to say, that makes it hard to write.

The big news about my health situation is my kidneys. As I shared earlier, I gained a large amount of water weight in a very short amount of time. I’ve been on several different diuretics, and use a pneumatic pump on my legs for 4-6 hours a day to push the fluid from my legs back into the core circulatory system. I’ve had to buy new shoes because my feet are swollen enough that my normal ones don’t fit. I have to be careful about my fluid intake – too much and I swell more, too little and I get dehydrated fast. It is really annoying and nothing seems to help.

It seems we’ve narrowed it down to where it’s very likely my kidneys. Not only am I dumping a lot of protein in my urine (symptom of kidney problems), but I’ve had flank pain that gets worse when I am dehydrated. I’ve seen a nephrologist and right now he has me getting blood and urine tests every week to see what needs to be done to get me on track.

There are also a host of other symptoms that cropped up, and we are trying to figure out what is related to what. I am having night sweats, insomnia, incredible fatigue (not just being tired because I can’t sleep at night, but being too tired to do anything and running out of energy just from sitting around and talking to people). My gait has suffered and even just walking around the house can be difficult.

There are also a host of things going on in my life that cannot be pushed back or avoided. My soon-to-be-ex-husband wants to change our separation agreement in ways that require me to have legal representation (ie, because I don’t agree with his proposal), but I can’t afford a lawyer and, sadly, my magical rolodex has yet to rustle up a family lawyer willing to take me on pro-bono. As separation agreements that don’t involve child custody are seen as very low priority, organizations like Legal Aid don’t cover them. So I have been applying to various charity organizations while simultaneously trying to prepare myself to represent myself pro se. I would rather eat rusty nails than do that, so I’m putting a lot of time into finding alternatives. There is also a lot of drama from that sector, and that’s all I’m going to say about that.

I also had a friend die from pancreatic cancer, only two months after being diagnosed. I spent time with him both as a friend and as a death shaman, and in the end I hope I was useful in helping him prepare to transition. I was there the night he died, and I did what I could to guide him to his next adventure. It was difficult for many reasons, and he was so treasured by his friends that the hospice actually thought he might be some kind of local celebrity. I think about him often. (I am planning to write an essay just about this, but I am not ready yet.)

It still feels like yesterday that my Mom died, and I’m still trying to tie up lose ends with my maternal family. I can’t seem to communicate with them clearly, no matter how hard I try. I had hoped that maybe my Mom’s death would help me reconcile with them, because I never met anyone from my father’s side, so they are all I have when it comes to blood-relations. But if things keep going the way they’re going, I may have to accept that my mother was the person who kept me connected to them, and with her gone there’s nothing left. I don’t know.

It’s funny, I started this post wanting to write about something very specific. I tried to post about it to FB this afternoon and my keyboard kept “accidentally” erasing it. And now I just don’t feel like I’m ready to write about it in any detail, so instead you get this. But it’s better than nothing, I guess.

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It’s Not About the People, Lesson 1

November 18, 2013 at 1:17 am (Death and Dying, Mental Health, Spiritual) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

This post has been brewing in my brain all year. I guess I was sort of waiting for a specific moment of inspiration or insight to commit it to an essay, but since my task was to contemplate what it means, not figure out what it means (both for me and in general), I’m going to share some places my year-long project for Hel has taken me.

This simple statement – It’s Not About the People – has been one hell of a koan-like puzzle for me. And merely sitting with my confusion, rather than trying to find my way out, taught me the first of many lessons that I have since tried to apply to my life.

Lesson One: Your Job is not to make people happy, or tell them what they want to hear, or do things for them so that they will like you.

I will admit, I am a people pleaser. Growing up, I compensated for my lack of charisma and attraction by being the friend who makes you happy. If you need to laugh, I have funny jokes and stories. If you need someone to help you move, I was there and brought three friends. If you need a rare-edition book for your master’s thesis, I will devote time and energy to find it. Nowadays, I joke about my “magickal rolodex” being my superpower, in that I know such a diverse number of people who also have a wide range of skills, collections, and interests, that no matter what you might need in your life, I probably know someone who has it or can help you do it or someone who will do it for you.

But these things carry a price, something that I have to stop ignoring and come to terms with. As I am losing mobility, having fewer and fewer good spoon days, and my resources are dwindling, I just cannot afford to be all things to all people. Sometimes I can’t even afford to be one thing to the right person – looking at some of my recently failed relationships, it’s obvious to me that there were parts where I just didn’t show up and engage enough. And I’m not deluding myself into thinking that it’s all related to my physical health – I’ve been pretty depressed this year and sometimes my ability to engage with others was extremely limited because of my depression. I am taking steps to at least face how bad my depression has gotten, but right now I don’t see an immediate burst of sunshine on the horizon. My counselor reminds me that sometimes the true observation is “Things fucking suck right now.”

As I explored this facet of the koan, I really began in earnest to think about and enact some much-needed boundaries in my life. There were definitely areas that were sapping my resources fast and dirty, and it will not surprise you that most of those areas reacted with the biggest and more painful responses when I tried to stifle the flow a little. There were some people/places/things that had come to expect me to jump when they called, to never ask for compensation for my time and efforts (and in some cases, even refusing to reimburse me for monetary investments). It has cost me at least one friendship, which broke my heart. But at the same time, it gave me an intense sense of clarity as to how some people define what it means to be a friend – that for some, if you’re not actively adding benefit to their life in a tangible way, you’re not worth a phone call or email once in a while.

I also had to turn this part inside out, and I will admit that I am still a work in progress on this. I had to look at how I deal with the vast amount of relationships (not just romantic/sexual, but all different kinds) I consider important and detail to myself what levels of effort these relationships need. The obvious example is my relationship with email – I have a reputation of never answering my email, or not answering it in a timely fashion. I tend to hide behind physical excuses, although they are sometimes legitimate, about my inability to sit and type for long periods of time. (I have tried dictation, but it doesn’t work as well for reasons that I won’t get into.) But I’d be a big fat liar if I said that was the only, or even the most common reason why I don’t respond to emails, return phone calls, or other forms of communication. I did a lot of meditating on the whys and wherefores about this, and two flaws I have decided to work on. One is feeling overwhelmed too easily. It would be embarrassing for me to admit how small a day’s itinerary can be before I throw my hands up and freak out. Like most people, I have days when I am more or less productive, but the days I am less productive have become to far outweigh the more productive ones.

Part of that is a honest coming to terms with how much actual energy I have on an average day. Although most people have days where they plan much more than they can actually accomplish, that has become almost a daily occurence for me. I’m either wildly optimistic about how much I can do, or I’m overly pessimistic and do very little. The problem becomes that there are rarely days where I land somewhere in the middle – once I fail to accomplish one or two tasks, I throw in the towel and spend the rest of the day goofing off. It also has the effect of beating myself up over stuff I failed to accomplish, as well as a slowly increasing backlog that becomes really overwhelming (vs. my anxiety driven feelings of overwhelm, which may or may not relate to the actual amount of stuff I’m supposed to be doing).

This leaves me in a pretty obvious quandry: If I make “make people happy” or it’s corollary, “Do things so people will like you”, my first priority; but I am coming to stark terms about exactly how much I can expect to accomplish on a regular basis – something has to give. And although in a dream world the solution would be to find the power-up magic pills in my real-life video game and suddenly have more stamina/less pain; the harsh reality in my real-life documentary is that I can’t always make people happy if their happiness is contingent on me keeping up with correspondence or doing other forms of work (especially for free – but that’s less about money and more about reciprocity).

Hel comes to remind me, or maybe just school me, that my first and most important priority is serving the Gods, and the work that They ask of me. So learning how to create better boundaries and knowing my limitations when it comes to “the people”, helps me be a better shaman and God-employee because They get my best. Many, if not all, the people in my life give lip service to understanding this, but I can probably count on fingers how many really grok how that has transformed my life. It has been difficult, because obviously what I would like to do with my life and my time is sometimes at direct odds with what They want from me. And in some cases, I have been tasked with doing the same thing over and over again until something happens (that is outside my control), and it feels downright wrong to spend time on something that has a high chance of being shoved back in my face, rather than spend time answering email and being social. But this is only one of the harsh realities of the price I paid to live in December, that although I had already forfeited my Will to Loki, that the deal with Hel included forfeiting most of my Life. This is compounded by the other, less obvious “benefit” that I have several Divine Bosses, and even a few that just Boss Me Around, and the tangible web/chains of the many oaths and Relationships I have developed over time has made me very circumspect about my own cavalier attitude I once held about accepting the offer of Whatever God Showed Interest, rather than really sitting and figuring out if I had the time and energy I would be asked for.

In short, I started acting with the Gods the way I acted with my schoolmates when I was in Junior High School. I didn’t care if you were a Jock, a Prep, a Freak, a Stoner, a Bad Kid – if you showed me the least amount of attention, I would do almost anything you asked as long as you continued to be my friend. I mean, I had more than one person say, to my face, that they really liked being my friend but they didn’t want the people at school to know (because then they would become secondary targets to the teasing/torture I got on a regular basis), and made me agree to keep our friendship a secret. I am not quite so desperate when it comes to Gods, but I know people who have been, and continue to be so. They are just so happy that Someone, Anyone is paying them attention, that they don’t really think through what the consequences might be. Loki may be showing you some attention, but don’t come crying to me if your life gets completely upended and you can’t seem to make heads or tails of anything anymore – invite a God of Eternal Change into you life, you get exactly what’s on the tin. Odin may propose marriage to you, which sounds romantic and important and satisfying, until you learn that He wants you to abstain from human relationships, or decides that you should quit your only-means-of-financial-support job and travel around the country helping the homeless and doing ritual for Him. There are lots of stories like this, and they tend to be the stories that you don’t find on the Internet – they are the ones told around campfires, or after rituals, or during pastoral care sessions.

This is where lesson 1 bleeds into lesson 2, so I will let you know what lesson 2 is as foreshadowing for my next essay:

Being a shaman means that you work for the Gods, not for your clients.

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How Do You Mourn?

October 31, 2013 at 2:23 am (Death and Dying, Spiritual) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

I read an article today about a photo-Tumblr that is solely comprised of “selfies”- pictures one takes onesself, “duckface” optional  – at funerals. Some of the images even had the dearly departed in the background. The author of the article used this to make the point that we, as a society, no longer learn how to mourn.

Historically, when a person died, they were kept in the house for a few days so people could come by, pay their respects, and mourn with the family. Death was a tangible thing, and in some cultures families or other groups of people (not professionals) would wash and dress the corpse in preparation for burial. Then, the funeral services became a thing, and once Aunt Tilly dies, she is whisked away to a mystical place where they make her look as alive as possible (if you have a viewing), or put her in a container where you don’t have to see her dead body.

On top of this, most families are wishy-washy as to how to explain death to children. There’s this express notion that you shouldn’t upset them, which seems a little odd to me. Losing a loved one is inherently upsetting, and eventually that kid is going to grow up and realize that Grandpa isn’t off having a very long nap, or is on the longest Disney vacation ever. We are so afraid of the mysteries of death and afraid of not knowing the answers to what children may ask about what happens after death.

But the predictable thing that happens after death is mourning. Even if the person who died isn’t someone you were personally close to, knowing that person won’t ever make another movie or write another book or show up at Christmas dinner ever again is a sad thing. You’ve invested some amount of energy into that relationship, whether it’s your father or your favorite musician. Knowing that you have to move forward in the story of life without the unique contributions that person, that relationship brought to your life and the lives of those around you can be a hard thing to face. Of course, on top of that, it calls into question our beliefs about what happens after death – whether you believe they’re just a decaying food source for the earth or drinking flagons of mead in Valhalla – I know that every time something ends, I wonder what happens to the entity that was.

This goes even further into our every day lives, because it’s not just people we love who stop existing in the form we’re most accustomed to. You might lose a job you legitimately loved, or have to leave the town you grew up in, or decide that your relationship is no longer working and needs to end. Perhaps these things, too, have some sort of afterlife? Maybe you start to collect photographs of your hometown, or write emails to former co-workers, or in some other way try to keep some energetic tie ennervated even though it isn’t as direct as it once was. I know that every so often, I google ex lovers just to see what they’re doing with their lives, what happened to them after they were a significant part of my life. I notice if they’re still listening to that band I introduced them to, or have kept the hairstyle I told them was sexy. I like to know that I’ve had an affect on them, even though our connection is severed or different than it was.

But when things, people, places, situations, come to an end, often we have no idea what we’re “supposed” to do. We feel confused and lonely – and that’s unfortunate. My family, being both Irish and WASP-ish, was one where you did not engage in big shows of emotion outside of the family house. No matter what was going on in life, once you walked out the door you were happy, healthy, and well-adjusted. So when we rushed to the hospital because Mom was sick, or when my father sat us down and blamed each one of us individually for why he was leaving (even though he came back about 5 hours later), I was taught that you didn’t discuss this to outsiders. Eventually, an exception was made for therapists, and maybe pastors, but that’s about as far as it went.

So personally, I never really learned how to mourn. There were no rituals or ceremonies that gave us free space to truly feel and express our emotions – maybe a tear or two at a funeral, but everyone looked askance if you started to sob – and if you chose to redirect your sense of loss by being sullen, difficult, rebellious, or detached, that was grounds for punishment. In the end, I was shown the only response to loss is to bottle it up and wait until you saw your therapist.

It’s only been the last few years that I’ve really started thinking, writing, and talking about emotional catharsis around mourning. I’ve had clients and friends come to me after someone they love has died, feeling lost and confused because they feel like they should do something, but they don’t know what. Sometimes, or especially, it’s after the funeral is over and they’ve had a few days to really think and feel and process, and by then you feel like you lost your chance because that’s what the ritual was supposed to be for. When my father died, I did the majority of the planning and execution for his funeral, so for me, it was difficult to dig deep and really figure out what I was feeling and what I wanted to do with those feelings, because I was busy finding the right music and figuring out where the funeral would take place and writing programs and delivering my eulogy.  It wasn’t until months later that I realized I had truly shut off any sort of emotional response to his passing, and I found myself feeling guilty for not “doing more” to memorialize him, and to process the complex emotions that I was having.

This is one of the reasons Samhain is one of my favorite Pagan holidays. It is a time and place where people are encouraged to truly mourn their dead, in whatever way feels right, and allow themselves to have whatever emotional response they need. And there’s no rule that says you can’t mourn your dead every Samhain – you don’t just have to do it the year they die, you can do it as long as you want, as long as you think you need, for decades if need be – in fact, that’s the way the holiday is set up. You don’t have to bury your loved one once and then move on in life; you can ritualize their passing, and the grief associated with that passing, for as long as you need to.

Another way I have incorporated open expressions of mourning into my life is by volunteering to mourn for others. When a friend or family member suffers a loss, I usually offer to mourn for them when I do my Rituals of the Dead. My “death altar” has items, pictures, tokens, and the like of friend’s fathers, mothers, high school buddies, as well as some from people I’ve personally known. And when I am feeling overwhelmed with sadness, as I do sometimes while dealing with depression, I put on all black and take out all the tokens and cry. I say their names, if I know them, and I hold their tokens close to my heart and just let out unadulterated grief. I figure if I’m going to suffer from uncontrollable crying jags due to depression, I might as well put them to good use.

I also build little mini-altars for my dead, by first burning a seven day candle until it is completely evaporated, usually lit as soon as I hear of their passing (or if they are very close to death and all indications say that’s what will happen). When the glass container is empty, I gather small items that make me think of them – a ticket stub from a movie we saw, a drawing of a brand I gave them, poems that make me think of them, etc – and fill the glass. I’ll also use “traditional” things, like rue, dried rose petals, lavender, fall leaves, and anything else that’s somehow connected with the death/decay/mourning part of the cycle. Sometimes I leave these at the gravesite, or I bury them somewhere appropriate, or give them to someone who is suffering and might find comfort with it. And sometimes I leave them on my altar, a way to create and maintain a connection with them (either symbolically or energetically).

What’s great about these things is that they don’t require you to have any one singular belief about the afterlife. This is not what these rituals and symbols are about. You can still write your loved ones letters after they have passed and still believe that they are mere wormfood. Or you can rest in your certainty that you have no friggin’ clue what happens to us after we die, and burn a candle in someone’s honor. These things are about you, your grief, your loss, what you need to do to allow yourself a significant moment to fully embody and express what this feels like to you. They don’t even have to look like traditional funeral tropes – if your friend was a drag queen, you can get dressed up and dance to Queen, go to a local drag bar and tip the queen that you think they’d be most impressed by, or maybe even get your ass on stage and do a drag number dedicated to your friend.

You can also use these things to help when the thing that passed was not a person. When my marriage ended, I found a piece of jewelry that was handmade for our wedding, and I placed in on the “death altar” while I spoke aloud about the end of my marriage, the death of the dreams I had when we got married, and the death of myself as his spouse. When I leave a house I have bonded with, I usually keep a token (most often a key, as I like keys) and when I feel nostalgic or sad that part of life is over, I’ll take it out and let it direct my memory fugue. Heck, there are still girl clothes I own that I can’t get rid of, because they’re too sentimental to me, even though I’ll likely never wear them again.

Samhain can be a time for these kinds of grief, too. It is the symbolic end of the agricultural cycle, where the crops have been harvested and now the plant matter left over is used to seed and fertilize the soil for next year’s harvest. We get ready for the dark of the winter by recognizing that which has served its purpose and needs to metamorphose into whatever’s next for you. You can use this symbolism to quit a bad habit, end a hurtful situation, let a part of you go that no longer serves you, recognize who you used to be and prepare for who you are to become. You can take a moment and allow the sadness of all the changes that have happened in the last year (or whenever) to flow out of you, in hopes that when you are ready to meet new and different experiences, you can draw from these memories without feeling the pain and loss. You can make Grandma Jo’s apple pie for your friends without sobbing through every bite. You can tell funny stories about when you used to work a corporate job, or when you used to be a girl, or when you used to only date boys. This is a great crucible to allow embarrassing, sad, hurtful, frustrating, and hellishly difficult situations become fodder for those stories that are only funny in retrospect. Or maybe use it as a story line for your novel, or inspiration for your next play, or to create a new RPG character.

So this is what I leave you with this Samhain: it’s okay to grieve. It’s okay to not know how to mourn, and to just open yourself up in a place you feel safe to do so, and sit with your feelings. Express them. Find rituals and symbols that facilitate this unburdening. Tell funny stories about your dead. Get rip roaringly drunk on your granddad’s favorite whisky. Go to the restaurant where you had your first date with your ex, and order the same thing you did then. Cry in public. Go visit a cemetery, find the oldest grave, and leave them an offering. You don’t need anyone’s permission to feel whatever the hell you feel about people and things and situations that are no longer part of your life. It’s also okay not to feel sad about these things – maybe your parent was abusive, and with their passing you have a better sense of safety and support. Maybe that job was holding you back from starting your own business, or living in a state you’d prefer. Mourning doesn’t always have to be all black lace and tissues – sometimes it’s a selfie taken in the funeral home’s bathroom.

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Surgery Tomorrow

April 23, 2013 at 11:06 am (Death and Dying, Hospitalizations, Living, Medical, Spiritual, The Panniculectomy) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

12 days after being admitted through the ER and the decision has finally been made: I am having surgery tomorrow.

In a way I guess it’s a good thing we waited, as I have a very clear understanding that we have tried every other option before jumping to surgery, and in fact the lead team on my case, Plastics, has been dragging their feet for several days after the other teams (Infectious Disease, General Surgery, Acute Pain Management, etc) all decided that surgery was the best option left.

Yesterday was the final straw. As I’ve written before, they have put several drains into my abscess in hopes it would deflate on its own, and for the 11 days I’ve been here we haven’t seen any fluid come out at all. Interventional Radiology, the team that deals with the drains directly, informed my surgeon that the fluid inside of my collection(s)  was too thick to drain this way, but my surgeon was stubborn and wanted to try one last time before he gave up for good. They poked a new, wider hole into the collection and then even went so far as to attach it to suction, and still nothing came out.

The surgery is not exactly the same as the one in December in a couple of ways. The December surgery did entail removing an infected abscess but there was a lot more infected tissue that wasn’t incorporated into a collection, enough to require a panniculectomy. When they finished the surgery, they removed some excess skin and pulled my belly up, making it much smaller (technically, a “tummy tuck”), and I had a very large surgical scar that went from one hip to the other. I also had two small grenade-shaped drains (JP drains) that helped suck out excess fluid produced from the surgery.

This time, they will be removing an infected abscess, but the focus is on trying to keep this from happening over and over again. They’re going to re-open a small portion of the scar from December (about a third, or 9-15cm) over the collection, remove the abscess and all the other bad stuff around there, including physically washing the space out. Then, instead of sewing or suturing up the wound (which will be “the size and shape of a small loaf of bread”) like you’d expect, they’re going to “pack” the hole with a special kind of vacuum-bandage. The idea is that if they just sew the hole closed, the hole will sit there empty, and nature abhors an empty space. By packing the wound, it is forced to heal from the inside out, and the scar tissue created will keep it from reforming a new and/or different abscess in the future. By using the motorized system, any fluid that is created from the wound or left behind by the surgeons during the operation will be sucked out in a more efficient method than the drains we used last time. (I have a bad history of having drains “fall out” before they’re done doing their job, no matter how many precautions are used to keep that from happening, and that could very well be contributing to the problem.)

I will likely be in JH for another week or so in recovery, and then sent home with a home-care-nurse visiting three times a week. They’re telling me I should be able to work (including teach classes and stuff), so I haven’t cancelled any of my upcoming gigs. I will have at least one, maybe two, small motors I will have to port around with me, but I’m inventive and will figure out some fashionable way to do it and not look bad.

I haven’t had much more time to ruminate on the spiritual meaning of all of this beyond what I’ve already posted. I’m trying very hard to see this situation as not being all about me, but at the same time not allowing others to use me/my medical situation against me in some way. It’s been difficult, especially lately, but I just keep holding my head high and be the man I want to be and let everything fall as it will.

I asked Alex if he could think of some witty vacuum joke or reference I could turn into the title of this entry, but joking about it would inaccurately convey my emotional state. I’m not depressed or amused; I’m pissed. I’m angry that it took 12 days for the doctors to do what they told me was going to happen 12 days ago. I’m angry that last time I was given all this lead time to prepare, and this time we have practically none. I had a very clear image as to what it all meant, why it was happening both physically and spiritually, and what I was supposed to get out of it. I understood it.

This time I have no idea. I have some guesses as to what it means, but they’re really just shots in the dark – and I’m also willing to accept that maybe it just doesn’t have a bigger meaning to it at all. I understood that the abscesses were something that happened because Dr WLS fucked up my ventral hernia repair that April, but this one doesn’t seem to be directly related to that, either. Last time I was able to garner support not just because of the health crisis, but because it coincided with my husband ending our marriage. Instead, this time, it all just feels like it’s landed on my lap and I have no idea why, or what I’m supposed to learn, or why this would have any meaning at all, other than to make me miserable and in pain and reinforce my fears that I can’t live a normal life ever again.

It reinforces a lot of the fears I was able to squelch last time, stuff about my divorce and my living situation and trying to figure out who really cares about me and who doesn’t. It makes me look really hard at the prediction I received three years ago, that said in year three the game would change dramatically. As my STBX basically disallowed me to talk about the prediction at all, I learned how to put it out of my mind, but these days it is feeling more and more relevant and yet harder to accept as being real. It’s dredging up a lot of inner stuff I was able to bury and/or hide for a long time and making it impossible to ignore. It’s forcing me to really and truly think about the word family, what it means, what the qualifications are, and what to do when someone who used to be an important member of your family makes it clear that they don’t feel the same way anymore. I am thinking about what honesty is, and where honesty is important, and yet where honesty can be hurtful and/or cruel at the same time. I’m thinking about a lot of things.

But at least now you all know that the surgery is for real, it’s happening tomorrow at some point, and you’ll all know one or another that I got out of it safely (or not). I will be spending some time this afternoon updating my will and advanced directives to make sure they reflect my most current realities.

Please feel free to pray for me, to ask your Gods (and mine as well) to look out for me, to guide me through this process, and to bless the doctors with clear heads and deft hands. Please do not send energy or Reiki of any kind; although I do have an anti-Reiki amulet to wear, it just makes things easier if you don’t send it for starters.

Love you all, and see you on the other side.

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Opening Up Yet Again

April 20, 2013 at 4:48 pm (Death and Dying, Hospitalizations, Living, Living With Chronic Illness, Medical, Mental Health, Spiritual, The Journey Towards Diagnosis) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

I am having another surgery. We’re not sure exactly when, but it will be before the week is out; my best guess right now is either Tuesday or Wednesday. The surgery will be very similar,  but not identical, to the surgery I had in December: they need to open my abdomen, remove an infected abscess that has now grown to the size of “a large grapefruit”. The various departments that have been working with me since I got admitted last Thursday have being doing all they can to try to avoid this surgery for many reasons.

Firstly, every abdominal surgery I have, weakens the abdominal wall and makes me even more prone to hernias and other serious re-occuring medical problems. As these abscesses are happening as a reaction to other abdominal surgeries, in a fucked up way removing this abscess may cause more to form in the long run. These surgeries are stop-gap measures so as to avoid a much bigger, more invasive surgery; one in which they would have to remove a portion of my bowels. My plastics surgeon, Dr. Sacks, is still hoping that pumping me full of high dose antibiotic via the PICC line will soften the abscess and help it break down on its own, but he’s the only doctor still hanging on to that hope.

This surgery will be different because I won’t be having a panniculectomy this time. Instead, they’re going to cut a smaller incision, but a larger hole. (Dr. Awesome described it as being about the size of a loaf of Wonder bread.) They will remove the abscess and any infected tissue that surrounds it, but they won’t close the wound when they’re finished. If they did that, they’d be leaving a perfect place for a new abscess to form. Think of it this way: instead of just evicting the tenants, we’re burning the house down.

So what’s going to happen is they will leave the wound open, but pack the empty space with a special kind of bandage that will help keep fluid from building up. I will likely have to carry around some sort of knapsack or fanny pack that has the motors in it, but I will be able to leave the house and go do stuff as soon as I feel able. This being said, I’m currently not planning on canceling any of my upcoming gigs except for the BR class (since I’ll likely be having surgery that day.)

Here’s a cute little tidbit: Either because I mention it in passing, or something triggers it, my doctors are finding out that I have nicknames for them. They mostly know about Dr. Awesome. The resident that I see weekday mornings complained, so he’s Dr. Fabulous. When I saw the guy who is working this weekend for Dr. Sacks’ service, I flat out asked him what he wanted to be called, and he decided on the Grey’s Anatomy moniker Dr.McSteamy – but I dunno, he looks more like Patrick Dempsy than Eric Dane.

This is McDreamy, Patrick Dempsey And this is McSteamy, Eric Dane.

I’ve been doing some serious thinking about this whole thing from a spiritual perspective, as well. I’ve talked it over with my pastoral care counselor, my Clan’s shaman, and other important spiritual folk in my life. At first, I was really angry at Hel, but I’ve come to peace with that now.

The first thing I have come to sit with, and to dwell within, is the shattered illusion that just because I made it through December’s ordeal doesn’t mean that I am never going to be sick, or in the hospital, or need months of bed rest. I had somehow convinced myself that if I just healed from that surgery, everything else was going to be smooth sailing from there on out. The arrival of the madness quilt, as well as the writing I’ve been doing for the book, let me sink into this soft comfort zone of not having to deal with all this death and dying stuff.

I had forgotten that way before I accepted this deal with Hel, I had agreed to be the Dying Man for Baphomet. Part of that Job is to explore the spirituality of dying and of death, so as to bring peace to others. In an odd way, the December ordeal was a formalized first step in that process, a “put up or shut up” moment if you will. I had talked about being the Dying Man, but honestly I hadn’t really thought about the nitty gritty of the death processes. Once I knew I had to face the surgery in December as some fashion of death, especially not knowing if that fashion was going to be literal/physical, I started doing a great deal of reading and research about the physical act of dying. I looked at pictures of dead bodies for the first time, real dead bodies and not just live models made up to look dead. I watched documentaries about how we treat our dead, the funereal processes and ancestor veneration. I read a ton of Near Death Experiences, and attempted to have my own through meditation (and meditation alone, I promise you.) Even after I woke up on the other side of the ordeal, I wrote a lot in my private journal about how the death process feels and what it’s like to be newly dead.

All of this, though, lived inside my own head. I still haven’t said very much about what happened to me, or what it meant, or how it changed the way I saw my own life and the lives of those closest to me. I’m not sold that it’s meant for public consumption, and by no means am I trying to say that I will continue to get abscesses until I poop out some incredibly spiritual insight on the means and manner of death and dying.

I do feel, though, that it’s important for me and for those who allow me space inside their head (by reading this blog or being my friend or anything in between) to cherish their lives. Each and every spoonful of energy is important, and what you do with it matters. This doesn’t mean you should never rest, running around trying to make every moment the best possible moment to the detriment of your soul and body; but it does mean that you can celebrate the fact you’re alive as often as you need to. You don’t need – nor should you really want – constant reminders that this life could end at any moment and therefore you should launch into everything that scares you or gives you pause. But even in the scant few months I’ve been back among the living, I have already fallen into the old pattern of allowing circumstances to overwhelm me. I spent more time feeling stressed and emotionally wrought because the effect of making choices that put my desires and needs before those of others keeps holding me back. I even got a message from a God telling me that if all those pulling me in a thousand directions didn’t stop, Hel would revoke Her permissions around having human relationships.

I let it get that bad, and it got that bad fast. It wasn’t anyone’s fault but mine, and I own that. The reason this abscess got as advanced as it did is because I put off going to the doctor. I saw the swelling and had a strong guess as to what it meant, but I was so intent and focused on the idea that I was moving on from all of that medical stuff and focusing on my Work I ignored it for far too long. And what really sucks is that I didn’t even accomplish what I really wanted to do with my time instead of seeking medical care; I spent the majority of it feeding the needs of others. This surgery is, in my own mind if not in reality, a direct consequence of not putting my own needs in front of the needs of others. Of not creating and enforcing my own boundaries around my time and energy. I like to think that it’s also the reaction from other people not respecting my feeble attempts at boundaries, but blaming others isn’t going to get me anywhere, and it’s not them that are going to be walking around with a giant vacu-wound on their bellies for a month.

As your friendly neighborhood Dying Man, I will share with you that the hard lesson I’m still working on. I have a life – my own life – and it is absolutely necessary for survival that a good portion of that life belong to me and me alone. This sounds very elementary, but for those of us that spend so much time helping and serving others it can be the hardest lesson to learn. It’s very easy to put your own needs aside, to internally compare the needs of someone else to your own and always decide that the other is more important.  Even more personally, I need to remember that my soul needs the body to express itself, and because taking care of my body is so much more boring than taking care of the soul.

Another big issue is that it’s hard to start building relationship and life skills when you’re surrounded by those who expect you to have a doctorate degree. It’s a two way street in some ways – I can muster all my strength to build and maintain boundaries, but because I’m still learning what it takes to make them it’s too easy for others to steamroll over them without a thought (or better yet, stand around and say, “Aww, look, Del made a teeny weeny boun-da-wee. How adorable!”).

In order for me to survive and thrive in the life Hel has granted me, using the skills Loki imbued in me, reacting to the hot pokers Baphomet has fucked me with, I need to take more time for myself at all costs. I need to stop wasting time worrying about things that don’t directly relate to the work (and Work) in front of me. This also means that when other people try to lead me down paths unrelated, I need to be more brutal and straightforward about distraction and what distractions support and uplift me and which ones make me depressed and unmotivated.

I will write more about the impending surgery once Dr. Sacks actually decides it’s going to happen. For now, prayer for discernment and clarity of communication would be the most helpful – and NO REIKI PLEASE.

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Don’t Panic

April 14, 2013 at 2:06 am (Death and Dying, Hospitalizations, Medical, Mental Health, Spiritual, The Panniculectomy) (, , , , , , , , , )

The theme of this hospital stay seems to be “Don’t Panic”, like the large friendly words they put on the cover of the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Except in my case, I keep being told not to panic over things that I feel pretty strongly are totally panic-worthy.

I come into the ER thinking I had liver toxicity, and it turns out that I have another serious infected pocket of tissue, and yet I am supposed to somehow be relieved by this news.

Then I find out that this new pocket, although smaller than the one that was removed surgically in December, has a “skin membrane” and also has “air pockets”, both signs that it will likely have to be surgically removed rather than treated via antibiotics. Yet the fact that it’s smaller is somehow supposed to make me feel less worried.

The fact that this time, they put a drain in and practically nothing is coming out, whereas the last few times it was so productive they had to use two or three bags at the moment of insertion to contain all the output, is supposed to be reassuring. Even when the nurses keep saying, “This probably means it’s not in the right spot.”

I almost never manifest a fever or other stereotypical signs of infection until it’s at “going to kill you if you don’t get to an ER” level of infection. Yet, the fact that I don’t have these stereotypical signs is supposed to make me feel good. In addition, since nausea is not a typical sign of infection (and yet every time I get an infection my nausea gets markedly worse), I shouldn’t be worried about my inability to eat (yay weight loss, says the nurse) or that the nausea is so strong I scared my nurse into giving me a EKG because of my symptoms.

Even though I’ve already blown three veins, when I start to feel the signs that the antibiotic they won’t be sure I need until Monday is burning through my IV line, I should sit tight and suffer until the line actually blows, because it’s really important. If I ask the doctor to wait to give me the antibiotic that burns my veins out until they can use a PICC line to infuse it, I am going against medical advice. (Yes, for asking.) I am being irrational about blowing out my veins, because using a caustic med before we know if it will actually treat me is rational.

When my pain quality and location changes drastically in the span of two hours, getting bad enough to wake me up after less than a hour’s consecutive sleep in four days, I’m supposed to be reassured that since none of my vitals changed, that everything is totally okay. I don’t know about you, but knowing something got much worse and there’s no apparent reason, scares me way worse.

I don’t know. I used to love Johns Hopkins, but now it’s just turning into another shitty hospital with nurses who don’t give a shit and doctors who hate you because you’re on pain meds. It’s another ER where I get shunted from room to room for 36 hours. I’m expecting Dr WLS to walk through the door any moment now.

And this hospitalization came at a really fucking terrible moment in my personal life. Yes, including the time I was hospitalized two weeks after my husband dumped me. I really needed, psychologically among other reasons, to have a few weeks where my health was not center fucking stage. I needed to spoons to have some big conversations, and instead the things I could have fixed three days ago are starting to fall apart. I’m losing my ability to be rational and objective, and just want people to stop being stupid jackasses, rather than have to spend an hour finding a nice way of saying, “Cut out your stupid selfish behavior you twat”. I need to get the work I’m doing, done. I need to be have the ability to answer emails. I was ready for this shit in December, but not now.

Things really, really suck. A lot. I am very depressed, and very disheartened. You may see me or talk to me and I’m all smiles and jokes, but inside I feel like I did all this fighting for a life that sucks, that I tried to save something that will just continually disappoint me. In a fucked up way, I feel the same way about my life as I did about my marriage in those two weeks before my STBX dumped me; like staying and fighting is the only decision I’m allowedto make, because of what I believe, but my intuition says RUN RUN RUN.

I don’t get it. I could probably handle this if it was something different, new, interesting. Hearing that I may have the same problem over and over again over the next few years is not comforting in the least.

Oh, and PS? They’re talking about more surgery. Possibly in the next few months.

Don’t panic, my ass.

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