The Unexpected Blessings of Pain Management Medications

March 31, 2013 at 5:46 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , )

It’s easy, sometimes, to get negative when you suffer from chronic pain. I mean, I’m almost afraid to open with that statement, lest my reader go “duh” and skip the rest of the post. I’ve written a lot here and other places about how my pain makes me angry, tired, upset, depressed, lonely, and frustrated. I’ve tried to includes some thoughts as to how it makes me happy, awake, contented, stable, connected, and calm; but it’s not hard to see how those times may be much fewer and far between-er.

I was having a chat with a friend who also suffers from some acute and chronic pain, and we were commenting on the effects of opiates on memory. It is very true that since I’ve been on the heavier opiates, and on a more regular regimen (rather than just taking them whenever things get really bad), my memory has gotten much worse. I’ve been lucky that I have someone in my life who helps me keep track of things, both physically – where the hell did I put that thing?!? I just had it three minutes ago!! – and temporally, like constantly telling me what time it is, even though I not only asked three minutes ago, but I’m sitting at my computer with my phone right next to me, both of which proudly display the time.

Now, granted, some of this is just Del being the peculiar creature he is. One of the tradeoffs of being a deeply introspective and mystical thinking sort, is that mundane and material things sometimes baffle the shit out of me. I have strong anxieties about every day things like filling out forms, or being on time. I get wrapped up in whatever I’m doing in the present moment, like highway hypnosis, only awakening when I realize I haven’t peed in five hours or I’m practically falling over from exhaustion or low blood sugar. Rave is excellent at making a plate of fruit, cup of tea, or whatever else I have been overlooking, magically appear next to me specifically so I can concentrate on whatever I’m working on and not deteriorate to a point where recovery takes longer than it should.

In a way, though, the opiates effect of making me much more focused in the present moment, is it’s own blessing. Sure, it’s annoying as hell when someone shows up at my door and I’ve completely forgotten we had made plans, but when it comes to things like having a meaningful conversation or working on an essay or devotional piece, people notice that I’m fully invested and hard to distract. Although, the distraction issue surfaces in a different way; if we’re talking about cars, and all of a sudden I see or hear something completely unrelated to cars, I might go off on a tear about this new subject and forget we were ever talking about cars to begin with. You might laugh, but when I think it’s important, I may jot down the subject of the conversation or the reason someone asked me to listen, specifically so if I get off track I can glance down and remember what I’m supposed to be talking about.

When I talk to people about meditation, one of the biggest hurdles they struggle with is letting go of the immediate past or the immediate future. They can’t relax into the present moment because their brain is too preoccupied with what just happened to them, or the thing they just read/saw/did. Or they might be fretting about things they could be doing instead of meditating, or get stuck making a mental list of all the tasks they need to tackle once this meditation thing is over with. I don’t have that problem, and I admit it’s partially due to the opiate’s effects on my brain. It might take me a few minutes to let go, but once I do, I almost have the opposite issue! I forget what I was just doing, or what I am supposed to be doing right after I finish. I let the thoughts and feelings of the meditation guide me to whatever I do next, which can be useful sometimes, but not so much when you have deadlines or pressing needs that must be addressed.

Overall, I am thankful for this opiate-influenced ability, though. It can be easier for me to let go of harmful emotions, if I just remove myself from any reminders of why I might feel that way. I can wake myself out of a ruminating state much quicker, and let myself get lost in whatever is more productive than sitting around bemoaning my current state. I can have fun tonight, even though I know tomorrow is going to be challenging in some way.

This is a big change for me. I’m a Libra, and one of the qualities we supposedly share is that we rehearse. Before I go to a party, I lay in bed imagining the people who are going to be there, and the conversations we’re likely to have. I play out what I’m going to say, and try to guess what questions they might ask and how I should answer them. Before each class I teach, even if I’ve taught it a hundred times, I take a quiet moment to look over my outline or notes and picture myself teaching the class. In fact, I can feel very flustered if a situation I’ve rehearsed in my head goes wildly differently in real life.

However, the opiates have softened this for me. Although I still rehearse, I don’t get so hung up on things happening exactly the way I project. I am quicker to tell myself, “It will be what it will be”, and not let myself get stressed over creating mental flow charts of “If they do this, I’ll do that, and then if they do this other thing, I’ll run off to the bathroom to avoid reacting to it where they can see.”. I can release my expectations and instead allow myself to fully experience the reality of what I’m engaging with.

This also helps me tremendously in my interpersonal relationships. Instead of projecting what I want or need onto someone, I can relax and explore who they really are and how they are different than the version I’ve created in my head. (Oh, come on, I can’t be the only person who thinks this way.) I can focus on someone’s crisis without getting overly distracted by my own feelings and needs. And honestly, people can tell me things in confidence, because unless it’s somehow shocking or important enough to leave a lasting image, I’ve probably forgotten it five minutes after you finished telling me.

It’s important to me to remember these positives, because the world is very good at reminding me about the negatives. People who don’t understand or experience chronic pain try to be encouraging by suggesting that if I try an alternate form of pain control, someday I might be able to “get off the drugs”. It is very hard not to be able to drive myself places, and the main reasons I don’t drive is because should something terrible happen, the amount of opiates I’m on would make me a liability. (Even though long term use obviously creates a level of tolerance, that won’t likely be taken into consideration if I get into an accident.) There are lots of reasons why the opiates limit me, but at the same time, they bring their own blessings and allow me to do and experience things I wouldn’t be able to otherwise.

Thank you, Mistress Poppy, for bringing pleasure with the pain, gifts with the sacrifice, and unexpected blessings among the suffering.

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Even the Predictable Isn’t.

March 26, 2013 at 5:38 pm (Hospitalizations, Medical, The Panniculectomy) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

This will be short, as I can still feel the effects of the Versed, Fentanyl, and Morphene in my system. Today I went to JH to get the new drain put in via Interventional Radiology. I’ve had it done twice before, so I wasn’t nervous or worried much; my only fear was that something odd would happen and they’d make me stay at the hospital, as the first two times were done as part of a bigger inpatient stay, and this was supposed to be outpatient.

I whisk through registration, and only wait for about ten minutes before it’s time to go back and gown up. I’m cool as a cucumber, watching some Netflix and joking with the nurses. They come to take me into the procedure room and other than the knowledge that this is going to hurt quite a bit, I’m still doing okay.

The first two times I had this procedure, it was done on an emergency basis, so I wasn’t able to do things like fast and limit my fluid intake. They tell me this time, that could be why the “twilight sedation” didn’t do much for me. The truth is, the first time I wasn’t given much of anything due to my blood pressure being too low; the second, I was given very little. This time, the nurse cooks up a cocktail I can feel; although I didn’t fall asleep (because, well, having a wire shoved into the sorest part of your abdomen isn’t really dreamland material), but I did find myself following trains of thought and being generally spacey. The nurse kept bringing me back to reality by loudly asking me to breath deep breaths; I couldn’t see the stat board, but I assume that even with the oxygen and my CPAP, my pulse ox was dipping. This is common for me when I have to lay flat on my back, which is why I never sleep that way.

When the procedure was over, they wanted me to shimmy from the procedure table to the gurney. I remember distinctly, both times before, being allowed to sit up, come off the table, and then turn around and hop on the gurney. This time, because I had been given much more sedation, they would absolutely positively not allow me to do this (and actually denied that it had ever been done, but whatever). Part of my chronic issue is that my arms and legs are very weak, so between the soreness in my abdomen, the terrible pain in my lower back from having to lay absolutely flat for so long, and the weakness in my limbs, this shimmy plan was not going to happen. So they grabbed some big burly doctor/orderly types, and yanked the sheet with me on it onto the gurney. Let’s leave it at: I cried. It fucking hurt. It hurt my newly punctured abdomen, and it really hurt my screaming lower back. They look at me like I’m an idiot, and without even putting something under my head to support it, they wheel me to post op.

Because of the pain, and that I metabolize sedation super fast, once I was in post op the first thing I asked for was if I could sit up. They bring me a recliner and my back is forever grateful. The nurse starts taking the personal items off of the gurney, notably my cpap machine, which some nurse has graciously packed up for me after the procedure. Except.

See, my CPAP: it’s a machine I use at night that forces air into my throat and lungs in order to bypass any partial or full blockages my epiglottis or other anatomy puts in the way. Sleep apnea is becoming fairly common, and I can name at least ten of my friends who use some sort of apnea device to sleep or who have had surgery because of it. And most machines have a water reserve, since pushing dry-ass air into your mouth and nose all night can be harmful; the machine humidifies the air (great for when I’m sleeping in hotels!), and you can control how little or much humidity is released. However, the big fat honking rule, for what I feel are fairly obvious reasons, is that you have to empty the water chamber before you pack up the CPAP. In case it’s not obvious, failure to do that means that the electronics that make the CPAP work get water all over them, and they think it’s a spring break wet tee shirt contest and stop working.

So I’m in post-op, and the post-op nurse is moving my CPAP case from the gurney to a table in the recovery space. She notices the bag is soaking wet. I groggily try to explain to her that I’m betting the nurse left the water in the chamber, and the machine is now broken. Now, to be fair, this has happened twice before to my particular machine. Since it is often people other than me who pack up my stuff, it’s been packed with water in it before. However, the big difference is, when my friends have mistakenly packed it wet, it was after a full night’s sleep, so there was very little water in the chamber. The nurse in the procedure room had filled it as though I was going to sleep for eight hours, and then only used about an hour’s worth of water.

We plugged it into the wall, and I was right. It tried to start up, but it wouldn’t go.

I don’t think I’ve seen more nurses turn pale white. Fucking up someone’s personal, very expensive, medically necessary machine is, one would guess, one of those things nurses don’t just get away with. All of a sudden, there was a lot of hustling and bustling as they were trying to figure out what to do. Secretly, Rave and I knew that she had an old machine back home, so worse came to worse I could use that, even if it wasn’t set to my specficiations, at least long enough for me to see the doc and get a new one. But even with that in hand, my biggest concern was making sure that from the moment we discovered they were responsible, and there was absolutely no way I had done anything to cause this, that Johns Hopkins was buying me a new effing CPAP. (And what good timing, as mine is old and makes a lot of noise compared to the newer models!)

Then the charge nurse announces that they can’t legally release me until they know I have a CPAP to use that night, and if we couldn’t figure something out, they’d have to put me in a room. No way, I thought. I tell Rave to call my sleep doctor’s office and explain the situation to them, and see if I could get a loaner or something. Johns Hopkins is doing the same thing on their end. I covertly planned that no matter what my doctor’s office actually said, I would tell them I was getting a loaner, and I’d figure out the finanicals later.

But as it turned out, my doc’s office does loan out machines, pretty much indefinitely, if yours is broken. However, it was now 2:15, and the office in Frederick (about an hour away) closes at 4:30. So my discharge goes in fast forward: I’m given some morphine to make the drive home a little less unpleasant. Since I’ve had this sort of drain before, they skip teaching me how to take care of it. They grab me a bunch of supplies, since I need saline flushes for the drain and they’re pretty hard to come by over the Internet; there’s other stuff, but I have most of it at home. And then they even call one of their orderlies to help Rave carry all the stuff back to the Duckbus so we can hurry our way to pick up the loaner.

We get to Frederick with plenty of time to spare, and it takes us all of 20 minutes to get the loaner. I get a phone call from Johns Hopkins Customer Service, as they’re just checking in that I was able to get to my doctor’s in time. I told her I was, and that I would be in touch very soon about how Johns Hopkins plans on fixing this issue. I must have sounded like a bolded statement, even though I was half-asleep from all the meds, because she gave me her personal line and promised that JH would replace the machine as soon as we could figure out all the details.

This is what I get for thinking any procedure involving me would go smoothly and without incident. I’ll be offline for the rest of today and possibly tomorrow recuperating from yet another tap of the Del keg. So far, the draining fluid looks serous, or not infected, so that’s a very good sign.

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Own Your Own Happiness

March 19, 2013 at 12:00 pm (Living, Mental Health) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Your happiness relies on you. You rely on your happiness. It’s a reciprocal relationship, one where you feed into your happiness bank, and it pays you in dividends. When you are feeling less stressed, more relaxed, more focused, more satisfied with your life, it’s easier to achieve your goals, whatever they may be. If you don’t feed your happiness bank, your life becomes a constant struggle to find a moment of peace, and you get diverted from the things that you want to be doing, in an emergency-like feeling of desperately needing that release.

happiness piggy bank

The problems may start because the people in your life – your lovers, partners, friends, co-workers, clients, employees, etc – also somewhat rely on your happiness. When you’re not feeling sad or stressed, you’re easier to work with, more fun to be around, and more able to give and receive love without hesitation. So it’s in their best interest to try to make you happy, in whatever way they can intuit that. Because it’s hard to ask, and get an honest answer to, the question, “What would make you happier?” And even if you ask it, and get an honest answer, it may be hard to manifest exactly what that person needs.

We all want to nurture the people we care about. It’s an innate feeling, hard to fight. If they are physically harmed, we want to be there with band-aids and antibiotic cream. If they’re suffering from grief, we want to give them a shoulder to cry on and things to distract them. If they’re feeling unloved, we want to give them as much attention and affirmation as we can. And if we’re not careful, two very unhealthy and unfair things result from this.

The first is that we give so much that we aren’t feeding our own banks. Everyone has heard of burnout, but few people are savvy enough to recognize the beginning symptoms, so it gets discovered too late. We spend so much time feeding other people’s banks that we aren’t doing things that make us happy, or only make us happy as a side effect. Even if making other people happy feeds you in some way, if you aren’t getting anything in return – and it’s very hard for sad, depressed, angry, lonely, neglected-feeling people to give much, since they feel empty themselves – then you’re spending what little you have supporting others. This can work in short-term situations, like when your friend loses someone close to them, but in the long term it leads directly to burnout.

The other side of this, the more insidious and dangerous side, is that the other people comes to see you as their sole or primary provider of the happy. If they aren’t taught to find their own happiness, but instead are taught that complaining to others about their bad-feeling feelings results in getting time, attention, support, money, or whatever else makes them happy, they become mice in an experiment, pushing the “happy” button over and over again, addicted in a way, to whatever it is that others have done to make them feel better. They become resentful and angry when you can’t feed them as much as last time, or if you have other things to focus on, or even if you just need a break to refill your own ability to engage.

It’s a trap we all fall into. We see each other on both ends of the spectrum, the one burned out from trying to make everyone happy, and also desperately trying to milk whatever happiness we can get from those who support us. In this cycle, we totally forget that we are able to do both of these things on our own, and in the end, it’s a better and more reliable way to get what you need.

We all suffer

Think of it in terms of money, because it’s an apt analogy. If your friend is unemployed, and you give them enough money to live on (not just an emergency fund to pay a bill or keep them housed), eventually the motivation to get their own job and support themselves starts to evaporate. As you realize that you can’t keep it up long term, and you start to lessen or withdraw your financial support, the friend blames you for not being able to pay their bills, or to buy food. They can’t see past the fact that really, that responsibility was always on their shoulders, and they just chose to rely on someone else rather than their own ingenuity and self-worth to get it done. There’s nothing inherently wrong with taking a break from supporting yourself – whether financially, emotionally, or spiritually – as long as it’s a “break”, and not “a new reality”.

I heard somewhere recently that “depression is the grief that comes from the death of part of you”. That when you realize you have to make a big life change, where something you’ve relied upon for your strength, identity, or survival (or some combination thereof, like a marriage) is over; you go into a state of grief. Sometimes – oftentimes, mayhaps – this starts not when the change actually happens, but when you (consciously or subconsciously) realize that the change needs to happen. I had already phrased this differently, for my own life, as “depression is a sign that you’re afraid to change something.” So when I get sad, angry, lonely, frustrated, or depressed, I look around my life and start to sort out what change I’m resisting or running away from.

running away from home

What makes things difficult and complicated, is that sometimes – oftentimes, mayhaps – the gut reaction is to try to fix or change whatever is making you depressed, rather than facing what it really means. And this is where we start to look to others to feed us; instead of facing the fact that you’ve become radically insecure about your place in the world, and that you need to bone up and face that, work on it, change it into something better, you start to rely on your loved ones and family to make you feel more secure. Again, though, that’s something that’s best only done in an emergency-type situation – if it will keep you from, say, killing yourself or turning to self-harm (alcohol, drugs, cutting, indiscriminate sex, going into debt shopping, etc) – but it’s not the solution. It might feel like it, because in the short term you do actually feel better; but it’s only skin deep. You can’t keep burning people out in hopes that they will fill the hole in your heart; if you can look back and see a trail of dead relationships, well, you know what they say about seeing a problem happen over and over again – it means the problem is you.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

But it’s sounds so easy on paper – make yourself happy. In reality, it’s hard work. Sometimes it sucks, especially in the beginning. You need to figure out what you’ve been doing that keeps you unhappy – staying in a bad relationship, giving too much of yourself away, not focusing on what makes you feel good, etc – and get it under control. That’s where most people resist the hardest – they don’t want to do it. They don’t want to break up a bad relationship, they feel like they can’t, for one reason or another. And we’re fucking talented at creating bullshit reasons why we can’t do something that will severely mess up the status quo. “But this job that pays me shit wages will lead to better things!” exclaims the person who doesn’t have enough money to pay the bills, “And it’s fun, and it doesn’t feel like work to me, and I like the people I work with, and I don’t want to have to take a job that isn’t fun or convenient. So I can’t do it.” Yes you can. It will suck, and you’ll be unhappier in the short term, but when you go to sleep at night knowing that your bills are paid, you have better health insurance, and you don’t have to sweat out the next car repair, you’ll thank yourself. Not only that, but you’ll appreciate the hard work and sacrifice that you made to get to where you are – believe me.

I have faced this sort of thing so many times in my life, I start to wonder if my diagnosis of “Major Depressive Disorder” (having many depressive episodes over a long period of time) isn’t a misdiagnosis of something more simpler – “Afraid of admitting you’ve made a mistake and don’t want step up and fix it.” I’ve made tons of mistakes in my life; maybe more than most people. I had a vision in my head of what I really wanted, but every time I got close to it, I started sacrificing things that were vitally important to my sense of self to attain and maintain it. I married Mike because I wanted something resembling a normal home life – I wanted a husband, and children, and I wanted to feel safe and comforted in that sort of arrangement. Even when it became clear that children weren’t going to just show up on their own, I still clung to this idea that he and I were a family, not a relationship, and you don’t break up with your family, right? So when he emotionally manipulated me, lied to me, cheated on me, lied to my friends, cheated on his other relationships, used money to control and manipulate me, and demanded that I keep up this appearance that everything was okay; I fell into it. I fell so deep that when it came to leaving him, I ended up waiting until he left. Yes, even after I called him on all the bullshit, I was willing to stay and work it out, because you don’t break up with your family. Even after we were separated, I tried to keep him involved in my life in some way, keep him in the role of being my family, and the more he rejected me, the worse I felt.

But anyone who’s been by my side while this has all been going on, can easily tell you that the separation has done miraculous things for me. It has freed me from all of the things Mike was afraid of, namely my transition, but a million other things, too. I was able to reclaim the course of my life, and took power in sitting down and figuring out what was really important to me, because I had learned the long, hard lesson that other people was the wrong answer. I truly believe that’s why Hel did two things in the course of my ordeal – one, she wouldn’t accept other people as a valid reason to allow me to continue living, and two, she declared that I could never make other people my main focus in life.

But things are getting dangerous in that realm of my life, because so many people are trying to get my focus. All of them seem to only want a part of it, but when you add it all together, I can point to many little issues in my life coming directly from this. I have insomnia because often it’s late at night when one or another one of my friends, lovers, clients, etc, think/know that I’m not actively working/writing/doing spirit work, etc (even though often they are very, very wrong) and so they pick 1am as a great time to process what’s going wrong with our relationship. (It doesn’t help that many of my friends/lovers/etc have jobs or lives that allow them to have these conversations at 1am, either.)

...and that has it's own effects on my health and well being.

…and that has it’s own effects on my health and well being.

I get frustrated at myself, because a terrible side effect of this is that even when a person only contacts me once, asking when they might get a piece of my time and attention, I overreact. I react with all the stress, frustration, and unhappiness that has built up from each one of these requests, and there have been many. I also feel like crap, because I should be overjoyed that so many people love me so much that they want my time and attention, and I sound like a privileged brat when I complain about it. “Oh, I’m too popular! I only wish more people didn’t give a shit about me! Woe is me!”, right? It also has the added detriment of making the people asking for my time – probably because they’re lonely, or sad, or depressed, or in some other way feeling negative about themselves or their life – feel even shittier, because I’m complaining about getting exactly what they wish for; people who want to spend time with me.

There have been warnings, too. I’ve had two very clear, verified by outside sources, knocks on the Del skull that other people are starting to take focus away from what the Gods want me to be doing; which right now, that means mostly writing, resting, and contemplation. All three of those things don’t seem like they are as important as spending time with people, nor do people tend to feel bad for interrupting such things. I was ranting the other day, when someone dared hint that maybe working on the book was really my problem, that if I had a regular 9 to 5 job, in an office somewhere, that was going through a crunch time (I have a deadline coming up that I have to meet if I want my first book to come out in June, which is very important to me emotionally as well as financially), no one would dare insinuate or state that I should just stop working and spend more time with my family/friends/lovers. Now yes, if someone was in “crunch time” for, say, a year, I could see advising them to not forget that life exists outside of work. But I only got the book deal three or four weeks ago, and the “request” of spending the year in contemplation three months ago, so it’s not like I’ve been in my hidey hole for too long. I also do go out, although mostly to events, but there’s a social element to those things and it means I’m not just spending my time in front of my computer, getting a severe lack of Vitamin D for lack of seeing the sun.

I even got some outside verification that this current frustration could be a test – whether or not I will bail on my promises to Hel at the first opportunity, and make other people a priority, rather than manage to set clear and unbending boundaries around what Hel and I both want out of what time I have left. It’s not like either of us didn’t expect this; I spent much of 2012 spending time with people, making them my focus, and so like the friend who starts expecting you to pay their bills, I’ve made many people accustomed to getting my time and attention fairly easily.

The deeper lesson here, as I am beginning to realize, is this “happiness bank” analogy. I have a lifelong (even in my childhood) issue of being so afraid of not being liked, of being alone, of not having any friends or lovers, that I go way further than most to make my people happy. I mean, again, look at my last marriage; I stopped myself from doing things I really wanted to, to keep Mike happy. I wanted to change my last name. I wanted to bottom more often. I wanted to start taking testosterone. I wanted to buy more men’s clothing. I wanted to keep my hair short/shaved. I wanted to date other people. These, and so many other things, I deprived myself of because it might make Mike feel the least bit uncomfortable. He was so used to me doing these things, he didn’t even see them. And when I brought them to light, he would blame me for doing these things without being asked. That’s true. He never outright said, “Never bottom in public, it really upsets me and reminds me that you don’t bottom to me anymore.” What he did, was get very sad and withdrawn when I bottomed to someone else. I didn’t like seeing him like that, and didn’t like being around him. Easy answer, right? I fed his happiness bank with a little of my own; I gave up bottoming in public so he would feel better.

But where I seem to be failing in this lesson is that when I take a step back, and try to illustrate to my people (my shorthand for “friends, family, lovers, clients, etc”) that I need them to start feeding their own happiness bank, and stop expecting my weekly direct deposits, they feel like I’m doing something directly to hurt them, or am being mean to them. It feels hurtful for me to ask them to be responsible for their own sense of peace, because I’m taking something away from them. It is hard to stay resolute in that, and stand by my own boundaries, even with the God-threat of losing all of my relationships over my shoulder the whole time, because like every other human, when I see people in pain I want to make them feel better.

I can’t. My happiness bank is currently overdrawn, and I have to fix it now.

What everyone's happiness bank should look like!

What everyone’s happiness bank should look like!

It starts with the most direct and dire situation – I need time to write, edit, re write, and produce the book. It’s not an exercise in ego, this project; it’s a direct line to making more money. I don’t want to get into numbers, but let’s say my alimony is barely enough (and sometimes frankly, not enough) to keep living life the way I have been living it. Events think I’m getting big in my britches when I tell them I can’t afford to pay for my own hotel, but really, it’s because I’m living on about an eighth of the resources I had a year ago. This weekend, I attended an excellent workshop on how to make more money as a presenter, especially how to do it without just demanding that events give you more in terms of compensation, and it wouldn’t be terribly hard to do some of those things. Of course, however, that they require my time and attention. This book is only one step in that direction – of being able to continue doing pastoral care counseling, teaching classes, writing blogs, facilitating ordeals, mentoring, etc – and not charge an arm and a leg to do it. It would be easier on me, and on the world at large, if I can ask many people to give me small amounts of money (paying for a download, buying a book, getting a reading) than it would be to only require my clients to pay me larger amounts of money in order to survive. I can help so many more people if I distribute my financial need among all the people I’ve touched with my words, my actions, my rituals, my classes, etc.

But I need the time, energy, spoons, to set these things up. That’s, understandably, have to come from somewhere.

Like many people who have found themselves in this situation, when I talk to people about this, they’re completely understanding – as long as that time, energy, attention, spoons, etc, doesn’t affect them. Like I have this secret cache of people to whom it’s much easier for me to say “fuck off, I need to do this other stuff.” Clients think I should tell my friends to fuck off. My friends think I should tell events to fuck off. Events think I should tell my lovers to fuck off. My lovers think I should tell everybody else to fuck off. And my Gods?

There’s that scary threat. That I’ll lose it all if I don’t do the Work. And like any good submissive, the prime directive is “take care of the property”, in this case, my life and ability to live.

So instead of writing sixty different emails to people about feeding their own happiness banks, I wanted to write a blog post that might help even more people. Maybe you need to feed your own bank. Maybe you’re burnt out from feeding other people’s banks. Maybe you’re suffering from depression because you’re afraid of the piece of you that has to die in order to make a change.

First of all, this is a universal experience. Every single human being experiences all of these feelings, at different points in their lives. Some people have it harder, especially if they have biochemical predispositions for feeling depressed, insecure, out of control, or in some other way not able to rely solely upon themselves for their own happiness. It is important to reach out to someone who gets paid to help you with that, though – because that’s the reciprocity. That’s why a therapist is better than relying on all your friends; the money makes it worth their time, and they can feed their kids and pay their bills at the end of it. (This weekend, I learned about the “resentment fee”, that is, how much money will it take so I don’t resent you for asking me to do this thing for you? It’s a useful tool for entrepreneurs who are trying to figure out how to price their services.) So if you are scared of the prospect of feeding your own happiness bank, especially if the need feels too great, it might be a good idea to seek out a therapist or other professional to get you on the right path.

Secondly, you need to know what makes you happy, and learn how to achieve those things without anyone else’s assistance. And before you tell me that “being around other people” is one of those things, you can go to a concert. Join a book club. Go to a bar. Throw a party. Do things where you create and control the situation, rather than relying on others. As I recently said, it’s so much nicer and easier for me to make time for other people if I don’t also have to invent the fun thing we’re going to go do. If you ask me out to a dinner and a movie, and you pick the restaurant and the film, I’m so much more likely to feel enthusiastic and willing to futz with my calendar to go; whereas if you just whine “I want more of your time!”, thus dumping the responsibility of finding said time, and then filling it with something more than just staring at each other, which makes it feel onerous and work-like.

wambulance

Take control! Make things that make you happy manifest. Throw your own party, instead of waiting to be invited to one! Go out and meet people, rather than expect your friends to invite you to places where potential new people might be. Put on your big kid pants and if you have to fake the confidence, the self-esteem, the security in your self, your attractiveness, do it. Practice little steps, if you have to. But I promise you, when you feel more in control of our own happiness, you’ll have more love and devotion to pour onto those around you, rather than sucking them dry of theirs.

So if you’re burned out? Say so. Don’t lay the blame at the people who have burned you out, because you chose to feed them as much as you have. It may be difficult to wean them, but in the end it will be worth it. Please remember that taking time for yourself, and solitary activities, is not self-indulgent. It is fucking necessary in order to be healthy and peaceful enough to engage with others without a bad attitude. Read books. Watch documentaries. Write a shitty novel (or a great one, whatever, just don’t pressure yourself about whether it’s good or not), it’s the doing, not the result! Take up a solo hobby by watching videos on You Tube. Make “office hours” – days of the week, hours of the day, that you respond to emails from friends, or take phone calls from them, or in other ways give to others – and make them public if you have to, so people know when you’re willing to engage, and when you’re busy taking care of yourself.

You can do it!

You can do it!

Don’t be afraid to unplug. Many of my friends have been reveling in the feeling of turning off their phones, disengaging from the Internet, not watching television, and then figuring out what to do with their time. We let so many things suck us in, distract us from the real flow of our lives, that sometimes we stop living. Mike was infamous for his “clicky games”, spending hours playing Farmville and online poker, and then complained that I didn’t spend enough time and attention with him. I understand the need for these things to help you relax, but honestly, I find they are usually just as stressful as they are relaxing. Maybe promise yourself two hours a week – a week – where you turn off your phone and disengage from the computer. Tell people if you have to, but sometimes it’s better when you don’t.

Remember that in our age of everything-on-demand, that you don’t owe anyone an immediate response. No matter if they call you, text you, email you, send you a chat, a message on social media, a comment on your blog, whatever; you have never made a promise to respond in a certain amount of time. Teach your friends by example that they shouldn’t expect you to be available to them at every hour of every day. If they complain, ask them what they expect in terms of response time, and then respond with something reasonable, taking the rest of your life into consideration. I had to make the decision that no one – not my mother, not my lovers, nobody – is owed immediate responses. If it’s an emergency, they’ll tell me so, and then I can decide if I can engage with their emergency or not. They have other people they can turn to, and if they don’t, that’s on them.

In the reverse, there’s nothing nicer than getting a message from someone that explicitly says that no response is necessary, or expected, or that I can get to it whenever I have the time. (Just, be truthful about this; if you know you’ll get pissed if you don’t get a response in two months, don’t say you don’t care at all.) So when you send someone something that requires a response, let them know they can take their time with it. After all, I’d much rather receive an answer when my friend is calm, collected, relaxed, and has time to spend on it, rather than a dashed-off, two word response that makes me feel disregarded and bothersome. Decide that quality is more important than quantity, and that you’d rather have a single email a month that was chock full of attention to detail, and interesting information, than six emails a day that are written while they’re simultaneously doing four other things.

short reply

If you’re in a relationship, be brutally honest about how much time you need from another person to feel engaged with them. Even if you’re afraid they’ll tell you they can’t meet it, it’s better to not be in a relationship where you feel hungry all the time, than to be in one where your partner is constantly feeling like they are neglecting you. It creates this terrible loop where no one is happy. And if the person you want can’t give you what you need, you have a decision to make. If you can get supplemental happiness from other sources (namely, yourself, but also other people, things, hobbies, etc), then know that you’ll be expected to feed yourself from those things in perpetuity while the relationship is happening. If you can’t, then no matter how sexy, charming, interesting, or stellar-in-bed they are, you’ll both feel crappy all the time, and it’s better off not to engage. If you’re already in the relationship and realizing that you have vastly different expectations in terms of time and attention, you have to be radically honest with yourself about whether or not you can live what what they give, and if you can’t, then you need to “take care of the property” and walk. Not every break up is about the lack of love or desire; sometimes, incompatibility is more than just liking different kinds of movies or having different hobbies; it can also mean that what you envision a “relationship” as, and what they envision, are too different, and neither of you will be happy. Fuck, read 50 Shades of Gray if you want a good example of what that kind of relationship looks like.

50 shades sucks

Beware of emotional manipulation. It can be really subtle, and most of the time, the person doing it isn’t even aware of it. But a statement like, “Oh, I really want to go with you on the cruise, and I think it would be good for our relationship, but alas, I don’t have the money…if only I could find some…” may sound like an honest statement about one’s financial situation, but it can also be a form of manipulation – implying that if the person wanted good things for the relationship, they’d happily pay your way on the cruise. But that way lies dragons, my friends. Big, ugly, nasty ones that I’ve fought time and time again. It starts out small, but once someone realizes it works, they will continue to do it. Model good behavior by stating your needs and wants in direct statements, rather than wishy-washy emotional ones. “That cruise sounds like fun, but I don’t have the money. Is it possible for you to pay my way?” I had an ex who would come over to hang out, but every time we left the house to do stuff, they wouldn’t tell me they didn’t have their own money until we were there. I remember standing outside of a nightclub, her having gotten all dressed up, driving over there, and only letting us know that she didn’t have the cover until we were on our way inside. It worked, though – for years, we paid her way into everything. I had another ex who, instead of telling us she didn’t have money for food, would just choose not to eat, and make a big dramatic show of it. But it worked; we paid for her food more often than not.

But what did those people also do? They also became exes. Because over time, they kept taking without giving. It’s okay if you don’t have the money once in a while, or if you’re up front when you’re invited – “I’d love to go, but I don’t have the money.” or “I’m coming for a few days, but I need to watch my budget when it comes to ordering food.”

The same goes from time, attention, emotional energy. It’s easy to give time to someone when you don’t have a lot going on. If you are asking me to give up time I need to be working on the book; then when I ask you for time during finals week, you better be ready to give it back. If you know you can’t afford to make that sort of sacrifice, then don’t ask someone else to do it for you.

tally

It’s not like you need to keep a tally of who did what for whom when. It’s more of a feeling. You should feel like spending time with your people is a fun, happy, feeding you sort of thing. It’s okay if once in a while, you decide to spend time with someone else because it makes them happy, even if it’s a little inconvenient for you. But if you see your friend calling, and always press “ignore” because you know phone calls with them inevitably last three hours; if you turn down invitations to things you enjoy because someone will be there who will monopolize your time; if you feel guilty posting about a fun night out with a friend because you know you’ll get five nasty emails asking why you had time for that but not for them; it’s time to take a step back and figure out where the problem(s) are.

At the core of it all, though, the one thing you have completely and utterly within your own control, is your own happiness. If you catch yourself thinking, “If so-and-so would only do things differently, I would be happy”, you need to take a moment and rephrase that. “Why is so-and-so doing things that way, and do I necessarily need to engage with them while they do it?” is a start. But really, the better questions are things like, “Okay, regardless of what my calendar says, what would make me happy this weekend?” “Instead of sitting at home, moping about having nothing to do and no one to do it with, I can be researching groups in my area that do stuff I like, or find a party to attend, or call up some friends I haven’t spoken to in a while.” Ask yourself, “What can I do, all by myself, to make this situation better?” If the answer feels difficult, or emotionally challenging, know that you’ve hit a much deeper hole, and it may take some time and attention to fill it, but you can. In a way, you have to. Because if you aren’t the arbiter of your own happiness, then you’re surrendering a level of control over your life; and you’ll still only have yourself to blame if it isn’t making you happy.

Do it. Make a list, right now, either in the comments, on your own blog, on your Facebook/Twitter/Tumblr, or even just on a piece of paper – five things. Five things that would make your life a little happier. A little less stressful. A little more carefree. And it’s okay if these things aren’t inherently fun in and of themselves – “saving up enough money to pay off the car note” doesn’t sound like a lot of fun, but if not having to worry about getting repossessed will make your life happier, then it’s still worth listing.

Then, hold yourself accountable. Each day, ask yourself what you’ve done to make one of those five things come to fruition. You don’t have to do them all in a day, and I’m sure many of them are actually made up of several microsteps of their own. “I brought leftovers to work for lunch, rather than ordering out, and took that $20 and put it in the ‘pay the car note’ fund.”

..and we all know how I feel about awesome metal lunchboxes, right?

..and we all know how I feel about awesome metal lunchboxes, right?

You, my readers, know that ordinarily, I’d post my own as an example. But in this case, some of them are involve other people, and I don’t feel comfortable posting that. But know that I have my own list, and I’m doing this too. And I welcome emails or messages about this exercise, as long as you understand that until my writing deadline is met, I have a limited amount of time I can spend on email (#3 on my list).

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Maryland House Bill 1453

March 6, 2013 at 8:50 pm (Chronic Pain, Disability, Living With Chronic Illness, Medical) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

You may have read some of this on my Facebook page, but it’s so vitally important to me I’ve decided to develop an entire blog post about this.

I’ll start by providing you the link to the NORML page about this bill:
Maryland House Bill 1453

From NORML’s page:

Delegate Curt Anderson (D-Baltimore) has introduced legislation, House Bill 1453, that seeks to make Maryland the third state to legalize and regulate the adult use of marijuana

House Bill 1453 would create a system to regulate and tax cannabis in a manner similar to how the state handles alcohol. It would instruct the Maryland comptroller to license marijuana retail stores, wholesale facilities and testing facilities and apply an excise tax of $50 per ounce on wholesale sales, with proceeds going to fund treatment programs to prevent alcohol, tobacco and drug abuse.

This is an issue very, very close to my heart. As many of you know, I suffer from extreme chronic nausea, sometimes unable to eat even a single meal a day. Although I am on a nausea medication with a very high potency, even when it removes the sick feeling I still don’t find food attractive (instead, it just reminds me how I’m going to feel when the med wears off). I have used cannabis in the past to great success; but since I’m beholden to a pain contract in order to obtain opiates, I am randomly drug tested with the risk of being thrown out of the program with no more than a single month’s prescriptions (and no support for withdrawal, which can in some cases be  lethal). Therefore, I can no longer take the risk of using an herbal supplement that I *know* works, not just for my nausea, but for my pain, insomnia, and neurological symptoms like tremors and dystonia.

Even though this bill isn’t for legalizing medical marijuana per se, by decriminalizing it completely, there’s strong evidence that my pain doctor cannot remove me from the program for engaging in legal usage of herbal supplements, as long as they aren’t contraindicated with my current regimen. And even though it’s risky to admit, my pain doctor has, on more than one occasion, made vague references that he wishes this were available to me, but that the program cannot condone the use of illegal substances. So by decriminalizing the sale, possession, and usage of cannabis, you’re not only helping our economy, freeing up our police force to focus on violent crime, and legalizing access to a substance that does less harm to the human body over time than either alcohol or tobacco; you’re also de facto allowing patients access to a powerful supplement that has been proven to be of aid to persons with MS, AIDS/HIV, cerebral palsy, and many other conditions. Because after all, if doctors can’t deny you service because you use legal intoxicants like alcohol or tobacco, then my fear, and the fear of many others in programs that rely on urinalysis to gain access to treatment, would be alleviated for good.

Even if you, personally, don’t enjoy cannabis, and wish that others wouldn’t use it, that doesn’t mean that it shouldn’t be available to the thousands and/or millions of adults who use it responsibly already. There are so many worse crimes we could be spending the millions of dollars we do on enforcing a law so easily circumvented. And the mandatory minimums are a joke; people with small amount of cannabis get longer prison sentences than rapists or child molester. It’s ridiculous, and has to stop.

If you live in MD, click on this link to send a message to your legislators about this issue. If you don’t, you can put my zip code into the form – 21742 – (it will ask for my street name, if you need it email/FB/Tweet me and let me know) and just tell them about me and my story. It has been proven that legislators vote their conscious in the absence of communication from their constituents; but vote differently if the people inform them they feel strongly one way or the other. So even though it’s a little internet form letter, it still gives them an additional push towards voting the way the people want.

Thank you. I really mean it. Even if you just read this, now you know my story and hopefully that will urge you to action.

The link, again, to the NORML page where you can contact your legislators.

The full text of the bill is also available here

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